Tech Support For Business

Everything from web hosting, DNS, cloud email and even the systems running web infrastructure (WordPress etc) require constant maintenance, assistance and support.

This is generally not covered by the large tech support providers, leading a number of “smaller” providers to fill the gap.

The scope is simple – if you have a problem with WordPress, Microsoft Azure, Exchange, Office, Photoshop or any other software service provider, there are a number of ways to get the fixes provided by a support company.

The difference is that the majority of support companies do NOT deal with code – only surface-level issues which are generally fixable by looking at tutorials online. In fact, it’s not uncommon to find companies just relying other [third party] information to help resolve clients’ problems.

To this end, if you have issues installing & customizing WordPress themes, managing inventory in Shopify, fixing Javascript errors, ensuring that web servers are set up properly, fixing issues with domain names, etc – there are presently *no* providers to provide this level of granularity, even for a cost.

This is where a number of “software” centric support providers started to provide services – giving companies & people the opportunity to get their entire digital infrastructure running as smoothly as possible with the provision of underlying software-level support.

The underpin to all of this is that there’s a “grey area” between where many “support” companies operate, and what clients end up needing.

This grey area has only grown in the past 5+ years, due to the increased importance of different “cloud” centric technologies, most notably Microsoft’s move forward with Azure and its accompanying services.

The “technology” business is undergoing a period of change. Soon, “software” will ALL be considered “services” – meaning that you’ll have apps for the likes of Amazon, YouTube and Evernote directly on your desktop – reducing the necessity of the web browser from a “do all” tool to simply an information consumption device.

Whilst this doesn’t matter, what it shows is that the “market” is moving towards a completely software/service centric model.

Thus, we get a number of businesses who end up in a curious position.

They may need their digital infrastructure managed, maintained and supported… but presently have no provider in a position to help.

It might sound trivial… but things such as how to get Evernote set up in the most effective way, designing & implementing effective systems with Zapier, or building out a strong spreadsheet for new businesses on Google Docs… no provider has the ability to go to such lengths to ensure that companies are running their digital infrastructure as smoothly or effectively in the “new” cloud era.

  • The “older” providers are too focused on hardware implementation / “infrastructure” level problems… new providers typically focus on menial issues with the likes of iPhones, Android and other tools.
  • The “software” centric provider gives users the ability to maintain this infrastructure as effectively as possible – essentially providing a shoulder for many businesses / consumers to lean on if they have *any* issues with their systems.

Both providers work in a similar way (providing “online” support staff, contactable via email, livechat or phone – and “offline” support dealing with localized fixes) – the difference lies in the effectiveness they bring to the work.

Software centric providers generally have much more experience of the different software tools for users. For example, they may have a particular way that WordPress is set up – or some Photoshop trick to ensure the best work.

This is what has lead many companies to begin looking at them as a means to ensure their growth.